Love and Basketball (My Ode and Caution to Jeremy Lin)

I love basketball. I love it. I get all giggly inside when I get the chance to run with the guys, talk smack, point fingers, and “oooh” and “ahhh” with the rest of them. I love that the game can grow with however many people are there and people of various skill/effort levels can participate. It’s just one of those games/sports you can invite people to join in, even right in the middle of the game. It’s a great game.

But I have to admit, I’m terrible at it. Don’t have a reliable jumper. Turn it over like pancakes. Can’t dribble.  I just sweat a lot. Basically, I’m the equivalent of a human folding chair that players use to dribble around in practice. But what can I say, I love the game.

And now, though I’ve been watching him with hope and anticipation for some time now,  Jeremy Lin has struck the NBA like lightning. And suddenly this game  I love is now featuring this guy that could have been one of my youth kids, it could be one of my college friends, and in some fantasy world, it could have been me. [Read more...]

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An open letter to Jeremy Lin

Jeremy Lin: you don’t have to be Tim Tebow

by Timothy Lo on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 at 3:20pm

I’ve been seeing and hearing lots of comments about Lin in the NBA being like Tebow in the NFL. I’m not sure exactly what the correlation is supposed to be, except that it probably has something to do with being a Christian. But I, personally, don’t want Lin to be the Tebow of the NBA…

I think many Asian-Americans, especially males, have tried to fit into America and are still trying to be accepted by the general Caucasian culture (or the African-American culture, as it might be in the NBA). In that sense, I hope that Lin doesn’t feel the pressure to BE like anyone, but just be himself. I actually get choked up when I see his highlights, because Lin is shattering the typical Asian-American stereotypes (he’s not an immigrant like Yao Ming, Dice-K, or many others) that I grew up with. If his success continues, he will redefine perception and be a trailblazer himself. I don’t know what it looks like, or what it will do for Asian-Americans. But he has much more on his shoulders and in his potential than Tim Tebow does, because he is not only Christian, but an Asian-American Christian.

[Read more...]

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Is Francis Chan…

… on his way to becoming the next Rob Bell? (Sorry, couldn’t resist tipping my hat to the last NG.AC post about Francis Chan. You know which one.)

Flannel, the folks behind the Nooma series (featuring Rob Bell) are launching another DVD series called We Are Church featuring Francis Chan. From their site (you can read the full post here, and watch a short clip of Francis talking about it):

…you might already know that Nooma was the beginning of a much bigger vision – a vision that encompassed working with many highly creative speakers to communicate the way of Jesus to the world.

Early last year, we committed to pursuing the larger vision and began a search for additional speakers to champion new projects.  The search process included wonderful conversations with ministry and seminary leaders, publishers, Christians bookstore executives, authors, pastors, and more that helped us identify well over 100 candidates… in the end, we felt God leading us to Francis Chan.

I have enjoyed the Nooma series with Rob Bell – the content, aesthetic, communication style and length (seriously, let’s keep our Bible study DVDs under 30 minutes!) have been a good fit for our church community.  I am looking forward to seeing what they do with Francis Chan, if they can capture the energy and passion of his live delivery.  Francis’ short film Stop & Think has a similar vibe (and clocks in at a very reasonable 15 minutes!) — a good sign for the future of this partnership with Flannel.  Stop and think for yourself below.

If this We Are Church series has a similar impact as the Nooma series, perhaps Francis Chan will become a household name in the way Rob Bell has. While I’m sure that’s not Francis’ goal — by all accounts, he is a genuinely humble follower of Jesus — I would love to see an Asian American find a platform like that to speak to both the church and our culture.

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