Notice any missing voices?

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month – a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian-Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island). See the latest statistics about this Asian American demographic published by the Census Bureau.

In juxtaposition with the sections on this popular website called Huffington Post. What do you notice?

huffpost-sections

The model minority myth is a lie.

Nate Lee (staffworker of InterVarsity’s Cal Christian Fellowship at UC Berkeley) shared this talk ‘The Moral Model Minority‘ at the Urbana 12 Pan Asian North American (PANA) Lounge on 12/31/2012. Adapted from an article published October 2012 in hardboiled, the Asian Pacific American issues newsmagazine at UC Berkeley. (Posted with permission.)

My father calls himself “jooksing.” Meaning, empty bamboo; all form, no substance. Says that when he was a kid, when he would hang out at my grandpa’s convenience store, all of my grandpa’s friends would call my dad that—jooksing. He can never be truly Chinese because of his American values, his abandonment of dental school dreams, because of his fractured Cantonese; He can never be truly American because of how he looks—he is stuck in the perpetual in-between. The scary thing about floating in the in between is that you become susceptible to lies from either side.

Many of us have given into the lies. This talk is titled, “the moral model minority.” I hope to show how the model minority myth and our compliance with it, has solidified these lies in our minds, and how the MORAL model minority myth, the lies in our theology, has solidified them in our hearts and souls. I believe Asian American Christians, if we are not aware of it, are even more vulnerable to the lies than our non-believing Asian brothers and sisters.

Raise your hand if you play piano or violin. Why do so many Asians play violin and piano? Why not the gu-zhen or the er-hu? We have mastered the epitome of the West’s art form. We have become more talented and more skilled at the finest of Western arts. We made it! But who will play the guzhen?

A motif of the Old Testament narrative is for the Israelites to remember. Remember who you are and who God made you to be. The unfortunate truth is that the higher we want to move up in society, the more we must think, act, and talk like dominant culture. There is a negative correlation between success and the maintenance of our ethnic identity. The arc of society is for us to forget.

For better or worse, we have moved up, and many of us have forgotten. Majority culture has told us that we have succeeded without any handouts, and we have responded with a resounding “Amen!” without realizing that our alliance with the dominant culture has forfeited our identity and implicitly cast an indictment on other minority groups. Many Asian American Christians, finding that their Confucian values of hard work, personal achievement, and frugality aligned with the Protestant work ethic, have in fact replaced the Gospel with the American Dream.

Not only do we interact with a society that tells us to forget, but our theology furthers our ethnic amnesia. Church historian Tim Tseng calls it the “evangelical deconstruction of Asian America” where “our earthly identities ultimately do not matter because our Christian identity is our most important one.” The church often says, “Forget!” You’re not an Asian American Christian, you’re just a Christian who happens to be Asian American. Perhaps in our pursuit to, as Paul says, “be one in Christ,” we have actually silenced our own unique stories and become cookie cutter Christians who offer nothing unique to the feast of God.

We did not choose our parents, our culture, our ethnicity. These are gifts from God. Perhaps our faith opens us up to live most fully into the distinct people he created us to be. But this is scary. It’s easy to have a list of what a Christian looks like, how a Christian is to worship, what kind of songs, what kind of dress, what kind of behavior. But to say that faith opens us to live most fully into who God uniquely created us to be, well that means that we’re free. And those whom Christ sets free are free indeed.

We have a story. Many of us have forgotten about the pain and suffering. We have forgotten that many of the ethnic churches we grew up in were built because many white churches did not worship a God big enough to integrate their worship spaces. Our churches therefore became ethnic community centers where we could receive language training, develop job networks, and obtain positions of leadership. However, instead of continuing to identify as marginalized and expressing our faith in a way that promoted justice (like many Black and Latino churches have), we clung to our upward mobility, adopted a white, Western theology, moved to the suburbs, called it God’s blessing, and began to view the world from a distance, through a privileged lens.

We must remember that the Bible was written for marginalized communities in diaspora, not for privileged folks whose greatest fear in life is failing their classes. We cannot forget that Jesus was a poor refugee, that he represented a Jewish people who were oppressed by Roman imperialists, and that he led a revolution called The Way that stood in stark opposition to the status quo. But we don’t want to believe this, because to believe in this Jesus threatens our hard-earned success. So we nail him to a cross and we crucify our own identities and narratives along with him.

The Asian American Christian community must reclaim its identity. We must realize that God has given us a unique narrative, a unique history, a unique face, and that his desire is for us to live more fully into the people he has created us to be. This has everything to do with the Gospel. God is making all things right, making all things full and new and how he created them to be. Let us not be like the one who looks in the mirror and immediately forgets who they are.

The model minority myth is a lie. It is another way of saying that we’re dominant culture’s favorite slaves—the slaves that everyone else should emulate. Because we’re the master’s favorite, we get to eat at their table, take their jobs, and yes, even play their instruments. But guess what, we’re still slaves. But it is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Perhaps we have been institutionalized in the prison of our own success. And when Christ comes to set us free, we cling to our own chains. Jesus says, “Those who lose their lives will find it.” We are so afraid to lose what we have gained, afraid to follow Jesus into the frightening, open, exhilarating space he calls the way. I long for the day we can throw off our chains, when we can love our eyes and our story and God’s face behind our own. I long for the day when my father will no longer call himself jooksing, but will be filled with the knowledge of the light of Christ, the light by which all other aspects of our self are illuminated and fulfilled. Amen.

Spreecast #4: What’s Identity Got to Do with It?

A conversation continues because continue it must. This one meanders over to the topic of identity, with DJ Chuang and David Park.
Programming note: for you regular viewers, you may have noticed these aren’t happening weekly on schedule, so they’re going to happen when they happen. Follow http://twitter.com/nextgenerasian for a tweet when we go live.

NextGenerAsianChurch Spreecast #3

Kevin Nguyen, David Park, and DJ Chuang – chat about Asian American‘s lack of interest in spiritual things, what do we do with that, how we as Asian Americans can better represent and engage majority culture, and more… http://www.spreecast.com/events/nextgenerasianchurch-3-june2012

And, have a happy 4th of July – we’ll return on July 10th with another spreecast and continue this thread or flow of thought…

NextGenerAsianChurch Spreecast # 2

We chat about the report released earlier this week from Pew Research Center, “The Rise of Asian Americans” on this spreecast with DJ Chuang, David Park, and Russell Jeung. Please join us on Spreecast every Thursday  WEDNESDAY at 7:00pm PT / 9:00pm CT / 10:00pm ET. (note: date changed from Thurs to Wed)

The religious identities of Asian Americans are quite varied. According to the Pew Research survey, about half of Chinese are unaffiliated, most Filipinos are Catholic, about half of Indians are Hindu, most Koreans are Protestant and a plurality of Vietnamese are Buddhist. Among Japanese Americans, no one group is dominant: 38% are Christian, 32% are unaffiliated and 25% are Buddhist. In total, 26% of Asian Americans are unaffiliated, 22% are Protestant (13% evangelical; 9% mainline), 19% are Catholic, 14% are Buddhist, 10% are Hindu, 4% are Muslim and 1% are Sikh. Overall, 39% of Asian Americans say religion is very important in their lives, compared with 58% of the U.S. general public.

NextGenerAsianChurch Spreecast # 1

We kick off a weekly group video chat for the summer, and David Park and DJ Chuang invite you to connect with us on Spreecast every Thursday Wednesday [Note: change] at 7:00pm PT / 9:00pm CT / 10:00pm ET. Watch this video of our introductory episode.

David started off with a sincere apology, cf. sorry is the new thank you. We chat about a variety of topics: RLTB (real life trumping blogging), pastoring in the 21st century, challenges in building a multiethnic community, identity, personal boundaries, becoming emotional healthy, etc etc etc.

Previously, we had posted a summary of this excellent article as “Differentiated Oneness and Implications for Asian Americans.” And, thanks to Christian Association for Psychological Studies, we have permission to post the article in its entirety:

Hung, Auris Huang. “The Concept of Differential Oneness and Implications for Asian American Families.” Journal of Psychology and Christianity (2006) Vol 25:3. Pages 226-239.

Copyright 2006, Christian Association for Psychological Studies, Inc. Reprinted with permission.

Mark your calendar, save the time slot, and join our next NextGenerAsianChurch Spreecast – you can watch the live video chat, join it in the chat room, or join via webcam too.

Who Am I? And What Do I Want?

Trout Island, MI

Years ago, I was a graduate student at Wheaton College, taking a class in Interpersonal Communication that was famously known as “The Island Course.” The professor would personally fly the class, two by two, in his twin-engine propellor plane to Trout Island in the northern part of Lake Michigan, which his family owned. As islands go, it was tiny, but still roomy enough for one grassy airstrip and one casual summer home with enough beds for our entire class of 9 students, plus our professor. Think of it like ten days of “Survivor”, without the risk (or blessing!) of being voted off.

It was during this course that I was introduced to the “Who Am I? What Do I Want?” exercise, in which you would pair up with another person and ask them these two questions, then switch, then keep going for as long as you desired. What we found is that as we kept answering the same questions over and over again, in time we would reveal layer upon layer of information, much of which we had never revealed before. Most of the pairs conversed for hours and found themselves in tears before the end of their time, my duo included.

And while I cannot replicate the experience here, my hope is that as we use this blog to share both who we are and what we want to see happen or change in the world, we will be able to do so deeply and openly, with grace, compassion, and understanding, and that this would become a safe place for us all to reveal ourselves and get to know one another–contributors and commenters alike.

“Who am I?” I am currently calling myself a “writer,” although writing is just one of my many wide and varied interests. I have finally written one Jeremy Lin-related post; authored one book (The Missional Mom) and co-authored another with a group of amazing Asian American leaders and pastors with whom I was deeply honored to work (Growing Healthy Asian American Churches). If all goes well I’ll be at work on another book this spring and summer. In my previous journalistic life, I worked at Christianity Today and re:generation quarterly. But I have secret dreams to 1) write an Academy-award winning screenplay someday, 2) start a business again someday (I have an MBA in entrepreneurship and once launched my own dot-com business that is no more…that is a story for another day!), or 3) finally declare victory over the daily beast that plagues me (otherwise known as “laundry”).

The Lee Family at Moody Bible Institute

But for now, my daily life now is largely consumed by mothering and homeschooling my three boys (4th grader, 1st grader, preschooler). I’m a second-generation Korean-American, married to a second-generation Korean-Canadian (the Korean-CANADIAN distinction is very important to my husband, and as I have learned over the years, we are definitely in a cross-cultural marriage!) Hubby Brian Lee is a classical pianist and professor music at Moody Bible Institute. Our family attends a largely Asian-American church in Chicagoland which Brian and I helped to plant 16 years ago. I am a huge supporter of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, as it was through this ministry that my faith grew by leaps and bounds while I was in college, and it was also through meeting Asian American IVCF staff workers (Peter Cha, Jeanette Yep, Jonathan Wu, Greg Jao, Henry Lee, to name a few) that I finally understood my ethnicity as a Korean-American was not a curse, but a gift to be cherished.

“What Do I Want?” At this stage of my life as a 40-something middle-aged adult (yikes, it’s scary to type that out!), I’m less concerned about understanding my own ethnicity and identity, and more interested to see the broader Christian culture demonstrate greater awareness and inclusion of the Asian American voice. I also want to challenge Asian American Christians to let go of cultural influences in their lives (both from Western and Asian culture) that are not God-honoring, and that encourage a particular definition of success and accomplishment that is more culturally- rather than biblically-defined. I’m excited and hopeful that this blog can be one vehicle to see these “wants” lived out, and honored to be a part of this group of contributors!

Please find me on Facebook, follow me on Twitter, or visit my website! I look forward to getting to know you better.