refuse to remain silent #notok

A call from Peter Lim on Facebook for our voices to be heard! 

When I was a child, while leaving a mall with my mother, a group of white young adult males drove up next to us in their red pickup truck and hurled water at us, literally spat at us, and began calling us “nips, chinks, go back to where you came from.” I was afraid then as a child but no more. When my sons are teased and harassed at school and on the baseball diamond because they are Asians…no more…I will not stay silent because this is #notok

As Asian Americans, we are seen as model minorities who simply remain silent, laugh things off, and don’t rock the boat. I say no more! I am tired of being the subject of people’s bigotry and racism and then told by the same ignorant people, “don’t be so sensitive”, “it was just a joke”, “I didn’t mean any offense.” I’m sorry but who are you to tell me not to be offended by your asinine and bigoted comments? No more! I refuse to remain silent.

Collectively as Asian Americans, we need to let our voices be heard. Deference has its place and value but not here…we need to exert our value, our worth, and our voice as a people and let the majority culture here in America hear loud and clearly that it’s #notok for them to continue to treat us in this manner.

I challenge you to share your story of bigotry and/or racist experience and use the hashtag #notok to let our voices be heard. These pictures I’ve attached demonstrate that too many people think it’s ok (MLB only fueled this attitude with the weak discipline dealt to Gurriel) and we need to collectively let our voices be heard that “No”…it’s #notok

(please share with others and let our voices be heard)

Progressive Asian American Christians Facebook Group

An article by Liz Lin original posted at The Salt Collective, “The Loneliness of the Progressive Asian American Christian,” got featured on The Huffington Post, “It’s Lonely Being A Liberal Asian-American Christian: Finding a church often means making a choice between theology and community.

Soon after, the Facebook Group named “Progressive Asian American Christians” reached 1,500 members in the span of 4 weeks. The group has progressively grown to over 2,800 members (at the time of this blog post). Here is its description is handcrafted by Lydia Suh and Liz Lin:

A place for Asian American Christians — of East, Southeast, and South Asian descent, as well as Pacific Islanders and Native Hawaiians — to share progressive views on theology and how we understand the world and faith through it.

We love how this community is growing and how we’re supporting and encouraging each other. You can find our community guidelines here: https://goo.gl/a5CUJR

We see this space as two ministries: A place for progressive Asian American Christians to be able to talk openly without having to constantly explain or defend themselves, and a place where people can ask questions. Usually we’re able to do both at the same time; occasionally, we hit some bumps. 

***

So… what exactly do you mean by progressive?

You’ll find a wide range of perspectives in this group; there isn’t a certain theology or set of beliefs to which everyone ascribes. If you want to get a sense of the kinds of folks who are here, many of us:

  • are politically liberal
  • affirm women at all levels of church leadership
  • identify as feminist
  • care deeply about justice — racial, economic, environmental, educational…
  • are LGBT-affirming
  • identify as LGBTQIA+

If that sounds like you, hooray! Welcome home. We’re so happy you’re here and we hope you find this group to be a place for support, encouragement, and growth. If you’re on the fence about a few of these things, you’re welcome here too. We’re happy you found us, and we hope this is place where you can listen and learn and ask thoughtful questions. And if you were added to the group but don’t think it’s for you right now, you’re welcome back anytime.

We also welcome folks who aren’t Asian American or Pacific Islander but are here to listen, learn, and support.

***

Sign up for our monthly newsletter, which highlights events, meetups, and resources from this group: http://eepurl.com/cxAyyz

You can also check out the other Facebook groups that have grown out of this one: https://goo.gl/WmnsQF

Here’s a list we’re compiling of progressive churches that are inclusive of Asian Americans: https://goo.gl/3wLqPN

And here’s how the group got started! https://goo.gl/Gp79sI

Christianity Today features on honor and shame in cultures

The March 2015 issue of Christianity Today had a cover story about the good news about shame,Christianity Today, March 2015 and that was followed by three featured articles at Ed Stetzer’s blog. Ed wrote [note: revised the grammar for better standalone flow here] —

Recently, someone approached me with a fascinating topic: the spread of the gospel in honor-shame cultures.

Andy Crouch, author of Playing God, and executive editor of Christianity Today wrote a remarkable piece on the gospel and public shame.

Jackson Wu shared four keys to evangelism in an honor-shame culture.

Jayson Georges shared about social media and identity.

David Park hosts Next Gener.Asian Church and serves at Open Table Community in Atlanta, GA. David shares about the unity and reconciliation we must seek amidst honor-shame cultures.

Andy Crouch: The Return of Shame
From online bullying to Twitter takedowns, shame is becoming a dominant force in the West. Thankfully, the Bible is full of language about shame. It’s just that most Westerners don’t see it.

How to Minister to People Shaped by Shame
Honor and shame dynamics can shape everything from evangelism to fundraising to family relationships.
Interview with Joe Ho (InterVarsity) by Andy Crouch

4 Keys to Evangelism in Honor-Shame Cultures
Jackson Wu shares about how evangelism can happen in honor-shame cultures throughout the world.

Our New Virtual Face: Reflections on Social Media and Identity
Jayson Georges reflects on the ways in which social media can tempt us to believe one of the oldest lies in history.

Dogs and Honor-Shame Culture: Unity Amidst Brokenness
Amidst honor and shame culture, we must pursue restoration and unity above all else.
David Park

Press Release: Fearless Tour in Virginia and Maryland 11/14-15

RE:NEW Co-Hosts Its First Concert with the “Fearless” Tour

With Asian-American Artists AMP, Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex, & MC Jin

ROWLAND HEIGHTS, Calif., Nov. 7, 2014 — RE:NEW co-hosted its first ever concert at Newsong Church in Irvine, California on October 25 with more than 300 people in attendance. The event featured artists from the “Fearless” Tour, including AMP, Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex (NAK and Nicholas Cheung), and MC Jin, with an opening act by Hillary Jane, and music by DJ Descry. The “Fearless” Tour is the first time these artists are uniting on the same stage with hopes of exemplifying the idea of being fearless.

renew-fearless-group-pic

“There are stereotypical barriers to get into the arts; people inside the church might believe that we need to compromise in order to become successful in the arts,” said Chung Lee, a member of AMP and also CEO & Co-Founder of Good Fruit, in an interview with Christianity Daily. “All artists take a risk in pursuing their passions … To live out any calling from the Lord, you have to be fearless.”

RE:NEW was asked to partner on this leg of the tour after an exclusive interview with the artists from AMP in November 2013. As a co-sponsor, RE:NEW received a percentage of the proceeds from the concert, which resulted in raising nearly $900 for the organization.

“Partnering on this tour was definitely new ground for RE:NEW,” said Phoebe Ng, RE:NEW project manager. “When we were first asked to partner, I was honestly a little hesitant because we have never managed such a large-scale event, but it was a great opportunity for our staff, as well as our dedicated volunteers. Not one person backed down from the challenge of making this event happen and ensuring that it was as successful as it was – that’s what I call fearless.”

AMP is a collective made up of East Coast artists including Lee (also known as CL), J.Han and Sam Ock, who seek to engage their culture through hip-hop with lyrical influences rooted in deep Christian tradition. Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex (NAK and Nicholas Cheung), Hillary Jane, and MC Jin composed the rest of the line-up for the evening. MC Jin was the last to perform, and has the longest career of the group since he became the first American solo rapper of East Asian descent to be signed to a major hip-hop record label. In 2009, he became a Christian and has since expressed his faith in his music.

Other event co-hosts included Good Fruit Co. and The Great Company, and co-sponsor Rapzilla. The “Fearless” Tour will be hosting two more concerts in Virginia and Maryland on November 14 and 15 respectively. Tickets are still on sale for its last two concerts, which can be purchased online at http://goodfruitco.com/fearlesstour/.

For forthcoming backstage interviews with each of the artists, subscribe to RE:NEW’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/RENEWtheRESPONSE, or visit RenewTheResponse.org.

RE:NEW a Presence movement

RE:NEW a Presence movement is the youth and young adult initiative of Presence Quotient. It aims to partner with churches to challenge youth and young adults to re:new their faith by equipping them with teaching, training and resources to learn more about Christ; providing a venue for people to use their God-given gifts; and mobilizing this generation to live with purpose. RE:NEW, which started in 2011, is based in the San Gabriel Valley area, and works alongside Presence and its initiatives. For more information, visit www.RenewTheResponse.org.

Top 15 blog posts over the last quarter

Top Asian Americans on YouTube
Jeremy Lin & Asian American Male Sexuality
Is Francis Chan a sell-out?
popular Asian American musicians on YouTube
The model minority myth is a lie.
List of Asian American Christian Bloggers
Beauty Is The Beast?
The Search for Asian-American Worship
Article: The Korean Pentecost: The Great Revival of 1907
Why Churches Split: A Family Systems Explanation
Why Asian American Obsession with Jeremy Lin is well, Weak
West Coast vs. East Coast Asian America
Jeremy Lin, The Civil Rights Movement, & The Empowerment of Voice
“A Silent Exodus” Leads to Freedom
The Ties That Bind Must Break