Press Release: Fearless Tour in Virginia and Maryland 11/14-15

RE:NEW Co-Hosts Its First Concert with the “Fearless” Tour

With Asian-American Artists AMP, Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex, & MC Jin

ROWLAND HEIGHTS, Calif., Nov. 7, 2014 — RE:NEW co-hosted its first ever concert at Newsong Church in Irvine, California on October 25 with more than 300 people in attendance. The event featured artists from the “Fearless” Tour, including AMP, Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex (NAK and Nicholas Cheung), and MC Jin, with an opening act by Hillary Jane, and music by DJ Descry. The “Fearless” Tour is the first time these artists are uniting on the same stage with hopes of exemplifying the idea of being fearless.

renew-fearless-group-pic

“There are stereotypical barriers to get into the arts; people inside the church might believe that we need to compromise in order to become successful in the arts,” said Chung Lee, a member of AMP and also CEO & Co-Founder of Good Fruit, in an interview with Christianity Daily. “All artists take a risk in pursuing their passions … To live out any calling from the Lord, you have to be fearless.”

RE:NEW was asked to partner on this leg of the tour after an exclusive interview with the artists from AMP in November 2013. As a co-sponsor, RE:NEW received a percentage of the proceeds from the concert, which resulted in raising nearly $900 for the organization.

“Partnering on this tour was definitely new ground for RE:NEW,” said Phoebe Ng, RE:NEW project manager. “When we were first asked to partner, I was honestly a little hesitant because we have never managed such a large-scale event, but it was a great opportunity for our staff, as well as our dedicated volunteers. Not one person backed down from the challenge of making this event happen and ensuring that it was as successful as it was – that’s what I call fearless.”

AMP is a collective made up of East Coast artists including Lee (also known as CL), J.Han and Sam Ock, who seek to engage their culture through hip-hop with lyrical influences rooted in deep Christian tradition. Mickey Cho, Gowe, Artifex (NAK and Nicholas Cheung), Hillary Jane, and MC Jin composed the rest of the line-up for the evening. MC Jin was the last to perform, and has the longest career of the group since he became the first American solo rapper of East Asian descent to be signed to a major hip-hop record label. In 2009, he became a Christian and has since expressed his faith in his music.

Other event co-hosts included Good Fruit Co. and The Great Company, and co-sponsor Rapzilla. The “Fearless” Tour will be hosting two more concerts in Virginia and Maryland on November 14 and 15 respectively. Tickets are still on sale for its last two concerts, which can be purchased online at http://goodfruitco.com/fearlesstour/.

For forthcoming backstage interviews with each of the artists, subscribe to RE:NEW’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/RENEWtheRESPONSE, or visit RenewTheResponse.org.

RE:NEW a Presence movement

RE:NEW a Presence movement is the youth and young adult initiative of Presence Quotient. It aims to partner with churches to challenge youth and young adults to re:new their faith by equipping them with teaching, training and resources to learn more about Christ; providing a venue for people to use their God-given gifts; and mobilizing this generation to live with purpose. RE:NEW, which started in 2011, is based in the San Gabriel Valley area, and works alongside Presence and its initiatives. For more information, visit www.RenewTheResponse.org.

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Top 15 blog posts over the last quarter

Top Asian Americans on YouTube
Jeremy Lin & Asian American Male Sexuality
Is Francis Chan a sell-out?
popular Asian American musicians on YouTube
The model minority myth is a lie.
List of Asian American Christian Bloggers
Beauty Is The Beast?
The Search for Asian-American Worship
Article: The Korean Pentecost: The Great Revival of 1907
Why Churches Split: A Family Systems Explanation
Why Asian American Obsession with Jeremy Lin is well, Weak
West Coast vs. East Coast Asian America
Jeremy Lin, The Civil Rights Movement, & The Empowerment of Voice
“A Silent Exodus” Leads to Freedom
The Ties That Bind Must Break

 

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Imported Entries to Join Our Voices

We’ve imported a dozen or so blog entries from another blog called “yellowfaith” – Ministry and faith from an Asian American perspective. Posted & imported with permission. Browse those blog entries here, they’re tagged “imported“. Below is the introduction from that blog (which ended in 2011.)

yellowfaith: welcome

(Posted June 19 2009 by Dave Ingland)

yellowfaith was created in response to the ongoing conversation of Asian American Christians and how they connect within the church. Should Asian Americans succumb to a Caucasian American worship experience on Sundays? If Asian Americans gather in a community of faith with other Asian Americans, should this be viewed as a form of racism? Is there an identity crisis amongst Asian American Christians, confused as to who they are in Christ–too Asian to fit in with Caucasians, yet not Asian enough to worship with other Asian Americans? When Asian Americans connect in a white church that seeks to be multi-cultural, is their culture truly recognized or are they asked to confirm to a white rather than yellow gospel? Should there even be a yellow gospel?

Here at yellowfaith we hope to engage in some hard questions in the interest of gaining some understanding to the state of faith in Asian American culture today.

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Notice any missing voices?

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month – a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian-Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island). See the latest statistics about this Asian American demographic published by the Census Bureau.

In juxtaposition with the sections on this popular website called Huffington Post. What do you notice?

huffpost-sections

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List of Asian American Christian Bloggers

Perhaps the largest list of bloggers who are Asian American and Christians compiled to date, with 50 blogs listed at the time of this post.

notapastor

The blogs listed are not necessarily Christian blogs nor Asian American blogs, they’re blogs of bloggers who happen to be Asian American and Christian as a baseline. The AsAmChristian Blogroll is compiled by Huan-Zung Hsu aka notapastor, and the criteria is stated as:

“… the bloggers are Asian American or have some connection to/interest in Asian Americans; and the bloggers are Christian or have some connection to/interest in Christianity. Doesn’t matter if they’re famous or well-credentialed or how long their blogs have been around. Doesn’t matter if I agree or disagree with their politics or theology.”

[update: this Blogroll is now hosted on the SANACS (Society of Asian North American Christian Studies) blog]

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Watch the Urbana 12 PANA Lounge Talks

During Urbana 12 (tri-ennial student missions conference), InterVarsity’s Asian American Ministries (AAM) hosted a Pan Asian North American (PANA) Lounge and platformed a speaker-series from leading Asian & Asian North American ministry leaders. Each talk was 8-minutes long, inspired by the short-form talks popularized by the likes of TED, TEDx, and Q.

One of the more provocative ones was Greg Hsu‘s intriguing talk, titled: “Asian North Americans: Divided by God?” or, more bluntly, “Why don’t non-Christian Asian Americans like our Asian fellowship?“

The IVCF AAM blog is posting a new video every day for the next 3 weeks. Watch them there >>

James Choung introduces the speakers-series and how Asian Americans can be redeeming our gifts.

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The model minority myth is a lie.

Nate Lee (staffworker of InterVarsity’s Cal Christian Fellowship at UC Berkeley) shared this talk ‘The Moral Model Minority‘ at the Urbana 12 Pan Asian North American (PANA) Lounge on 12/31/2012. Adapted from an article published October 2012 in hardboiled, the Asian Pacific American issues newsmagazine at UC Berkeley. (Posted with permission.)

My father calls himself “jooksing.” Meaning, empty bamboo; all form, no substance. Says that when he was a kid, when he would hang out at my grandpa’s convenience store, all of my grandpa’s friends would call my dad that—jooksing. He can never be truly Chinese because of his American values, his abandonment of dental school dreams, because of his fractured Cantonese; He can never be truly American because of how he looks—he is stuck in the perpetual in-between. The scary thing about floating in the in between is that you become susceptible to lies from either side.

Many of us have given into the lies. This talk is titled, “the moral model minority.” I hope to show how the model minority myth and our compliance with it, has solidified these lies in our minds, and how the MORAL model minority myth, the lies in our theology, has solidified them in our hearts and souls. I believe Asian American Christians, if we are not aware of it, are even more vulnerable to the lies than our non-believing Asian brothers and sisters.

Raise your hand if you play piano or violin. Why do so many Asians play violin and piano? Why not the gu-zhen or the er-hu? We have mastered the epitome of the West’s art form. We have become more talented and more skilled at the finest of Western arts. We made it! But who will play the guzhen?

A motif of the Old Testament narrative is for the Israelites to remember. Remember who you are and who God made you to be. The unfortunate truth is that the higher we want to move up in society, the more we must think, act, and talk like dominant culture. There is a negative correlation between success and the maintenance of our ethnic identity. The arc of society is for us to forget.

For better or worse, we have moved up, and many of us have forgotten. Majority culture has told us that we have succeeded without any handouts, and we have responded with a resounding “Amen!” without realizing that our alliance with the dominant culture has forfeited our identity and implicitly cast an indictment on other minority groups. Many Asian American Christians, finding that their Confucian values of hard work, personal achievement, and frugality aligned with the Protestant work ethic, have in fact replaced the Gospel with the American Dream.

Not only do we interact with a society that tells us to forget, but our theology furthers our ethnic amnesia. Church historian Tim Tseng calls it the “evangelical deconstruction of Asian America” where “our earthly identities ultimately do not matter because our Christian identity is our most important one.” The church often says, “Forget!” You’re not an Asian American Christian, you’re just a Christian who happens to be Asian American. Perhaps in our pursuit to, as Paul says, “be one in Christ,” we have actually silenced our own unique stories and become cookie cutter Christians who offer nothing unique to the feast of God.

We did not choose our parents, our culture, our ethnicity. These are gifts from God. Perhaps our faith opens us up to live most fully into the distinct people he created us to be. But this is scary. It’s easy to have a list of what a Christian looks like, how a Christian is to worship, what kind of songs, what kind of dress, what kind of behavior. But to say that faith opens us to live most fully into who God uniquely created us to be, well that means that we’re free. And those whom Christ sets free are free indeed.

We have a story. Many of us have forgotten about the pain and suffering. We have forgotten that many of the ethnic churches we grew up in were built because many white churches did not worship a God big enough to integrate their worship spaces. Our churches therefore became ethnic community centers where we could receive language training, develop job networks, and obtain positions of leadership. However, instead of continuing to identify as marginalized and expressing our faith in a way that promoted justice (like many Black and Latino churches have), we clung to our upward mobility, adopted a white, Western theology, moved to the suburbs, called it God’s blessing, and began to view the world from a distance, through a privileged lens.

We must remember that the Bible was written for marginalized communities in diaspora, not for privileged folks whose greatest fear in life is failing their classes. We cannot forget that Jesus was a poor refugee, that he represented a Jewish people who were oppressed by Roman imperialists, and that he led a revolution called The Way that stood in stark opposition to the status quo. But we don’t want to believe this, because to believe in this Jesus threatens our hard-earned success. So we nail him to a cross and we crucify our own identities and narratives along with him.

The Asian American Christian community must reclaim its identity. We must realize that God has given us a unique narrative, a unique history, a unique face, and that his desire is for us to live more fully into the people he has created us to be. This has everything to do with the Gospel. God is making all things right, making all things full and new and how he created them to be. Let us not be like the one who looks in the mirror and immediately forgets who they are.

The model minority myth is a lie. It is another way of saying that we’re dominant culture’s favorite slaves—the slaves that everyone else should emulate. Because we’re the master’s favorite, we get to eat at their table, take their jobs, and yes, even play their instruments. But guess what, we’re still slaves. But it is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Perhaps we have been institutionalized in the prison of our own success. And when Christ comes to set us free, we cling to our own chains. Jesus says, “Those who lose their lives will find it.” We are so afraid to lose what we have gained, afraid to follow Jesus into the frightening, open, exhilarating space he calls the way. I long for the day we can throw off our chains, when we can love our eyes and our story and God’s face behind our own. I long for the day when my father will no longer call himself jooksing, but will be filled with the knowledge of the light of Christ, the light by which all other aspects of our self are illuminated and fulfilled. Amen.

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