Imported Entries to Join Our Voices

We’ve imported a dozen or so blog entries from another blog called “yellowfaith” – Ministry and faith from an Asian American perspective. Posted & imported with permission. Browse those blog entries here, they’re tagged “imported“. Below is the introduction from that blog (which ended in 2011.)

yellowfaith: welcome

(Posted June 19 2009 by Dave Ingland)

yellowfaith was created in response to the ongoing conversation of Asian American Christians and how they connect within the church. Should Asian Americans succumb to a Caucasian American worship experience on Sundays? If Asian Americans gather in a community of faith with other Asian Americans, should this be viewed as a form of racism? Is there an identity crisis amongst Asian American Christians, confused as to who they are in Christ–too Asian to fit in with Caucasians, yet not Asian enough to worship with other Asian Americans? When Asian Americans connect in a white church that seeks to be multi-cultural, is their culture truly recognized or are they asked to confirm to a white rather than yellow gospel? Should there even be a yellow gospel?

Here at yellowfaith we hope to engage in some hard questions in the interest of gaining some understanding to the state of faith in Asian American culture today.

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Comments

  1. isaacblog says:

    Congrats on starting this conversation! I suggest that you eliminate the hyphen between “Asian” and “American” and avoid using “yellow” – the latter because “yellow” excludes many Asian Americans and the former because a hyphenated identity implies that Asian Americans are not fully American. – Tim Tseng, Executive Director, Institute for the Study of Asian American Christianity (http://isaacweb.org)

  2. Hey Dr. Tseng, I’m curious about your comment about the hyphen. I don’t think I’ve thought about it like that. Do you think the same applies for African Americans?

  3. Tim Tseng says:

    Hi Daniel, even though journalists and publishers use the “hyphen” as a commonly accepted writing convention, scholars of ethnicity have attempted to eliminate it because of its unsavory history (or as a reminder of that history). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyphenated_American

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